An analysis of the pardoner as as representative of the church

By this, the idea of the pardoner as the most important man on the pilgrimage is brought to fruition and Chaucer makes the main point of this tale: When Augustine died some time between and ADthen, Christianity had only a precarious hold on Anglo-Saxon England, a hold which was limited largely to a few in the aristocracy.

The Pardoner was a church official who had the authority to forgive those who had sinned by selling pardons and indulgences to them.

The Pardoner As Representative Of The Church Essay

After almost two hundred lines of sermonizing, the Pardoner finally returns to his story of the lecherous Flemish youngsters. He that his hand wol putte in this mitayn, He shal have multipliyng of his greyn, lines — But he will warn that any person that "hath doon synne horrible" will not be able to benefit from these relics.

The Canterbury Tales

The medieval period may have had some of this although many of the saints were not even born yet Hindsight has blurred our vision of the Medieval monk and the result is that the modern Christian mindset has condemned him for his selfish escapism from the world and for his apparent neglect of those who needed Christ outside of the cloister.

Church after church was and still is erected in her name. He admits extortion of the poor, pocketing of indulgencesand failure to abide by teachings against jealousy and avarice. The first circle is reserved for the least offensive sinner, with each subsequent circle holding ever more evil sinners, finally ending in the most pernicious and vicious sinners, including betrayers such as Judas Iscariot and Brutus.

There are comments from this time of a decline in learning among churchmen and an increase in a love for things of this earthly world. A voys he hadde as smal as hath a goot.

Salvation is not for sale. Perhaps the separation of the two is not necessary and was not complete at this point in time. As three of these rioters sit drinking, they hear a funeral knell. I wol none of the Apostles countrefete: At all levels of society, belief in a god or gods was not a matter of choice, it was a matter of fact.

At the time of The Canterbury Tales, many of a people who were Christians officially, politically, and in most cases at heart, saw that there were elements of paganism and sorcery which is tolerated and respected.

The Wife of Bath gives away details about herself in the prologue to her particular tale.

An analysis of the pardoner as as representative of the church

Many persons and scholars reference him as "death in person", "the Wandering Jew", "Old Age itself", and "Death's messenger". Even more of these lax standards had begun a decline in the power structure of the church which included a decrease in acceptable behavior amongst churchmen and a growing use of church institutions by lay people as a means of evading taxes.

The eminent question then becomes, "Why would people change from a long-lasting, Old-Testament God to a mother-like goddess? He proposes that they draw straws, and whichever one gets the short straw must go to town to get food and drink so they can wait out the day.

Canterbury Tales - Medieval Church

As a matter of fact, the pardoner is only in it for the money, as evident from this passage: His one and only interest is to fill his ever-deepening pockets. As a matter of fact, the pardoner is only in it for the money, as evident from this passage: Still, we are told that history repeats itself because nobody listens to it, but more realistically history repeats itself because man is essentially the same from one generation to the next.

Monks renounced all their worldly belongings and by taking vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, joined a community of monks.

Christianity affected all men in Europe at every level and in every way. Thus, all three of the revelers die. The Pardoner, a devious and somewhat dubious individual had one goal: Such distances however, led to much diversity and the shaping of Medieval religion into a land of contrasts.

Some critics have called him the most thoroughly modern character in The Canterbury Tales, especially in his use of modern psychology to dupe his victims. This form of Paganism existed in Britain of the Middle ages, full of spiritual beings, full of magic, alive with heavenly power existing on Earth.

He could easily be the richest man in town, he realizes, if he could have all the gold to himself. Prologue[ edit ] The prologue takes the form of a literary confession in the same manner as The Wife of Bath's Prologue. It became more organized, more bureaucratic, more legal, more centralized and basically more powerful on a European scale.

Hindsight has blurred our vision of the Medieval monk and the result is that the modern Christian mindset has condemned him for his selfish escapism from the world and for his apparent neglect of those who needed Christ outside of the cloister.Satire: The Pardoner is representative of the corruption and greed inside the "church court".

The Pardoner takes advantage of the common man's naivete and uses it for his own personal gain. *Its actually pretty sarcastic. The Pardoner is representative of the seamy side of the corrupt church and a broken or twisted (if you will) faith.

The faith of a bureaucracy, which is what the church had become. The Pardoner was a church official who had the authority to forgive those who had sinned by selling pardons and indulgences to them.

The Pardoner as a Representative of the Church. The Pardoner is a disreputable representative of the church - The Pardoner As Representative Of The Church Essay introduction.

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Canterbury Tales - Medieval Church

General Prologue? describes him as being a prevarication, victimizing dissembler, and he. Character Analysis The Pardoner is a representative of the Church who's authorized to go around selling relics and pardons for forgiveness of sin.

Although Pardoners were allowed to keep a portion of their receipts, our guy has taken it to a whole new level. CHAUCER'S VIEW OF THE CHURCH IN ENGLAND I S 1 FOURTEENTH CENTURY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 13 III.

The Pardoner's Tale

Historical documents declare the wretched condi­ tions--"Internal" causes of Church weakness-­ External causes of Church weakness: principally John Wyclif and the Lollards. The pardoner is a complicated character—the morals spouting and yet gleefully immoral man of the church.

And as such it speaks volumes about the church that such a man would be associated with it.

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An analysis of the pardoner as as representative of the church
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